NEW RELEASES July 7, 2017

Jay Z: 4:44
Jay-Z’s new 4:44 album has everybody going crazy, and now there’s audio of Hov breaking every song on the album down. The new LP was played across over 160 iHeart Radio stations in the U.S. at midnight, and in addition to the album being played on national radio, Jay also gave insight to each track. “Kill Jay-Z” “The first song is called ‘Kill Jay-Z’ and obviously, it’s not to be taken literal. It’s really about the ego. It’s about killing off the ego, so we can have this conversation in a place of vulnerability and honesty.” “The Story of OJ” “‘The Story of OJ’ is really a song about we as a culture, having a plan, how we’re gonna push this forward. We all make money, and then we all lose money, as artists especially. But how, when you have some type of success, to transform that into something bigger.” “Smile” “‘Smile’ is just what it is. There are gonna be bad times, and those bad times can do two things: they can get you in a place where you’re stuck in a rut, or it can make your future that much better because you’ve experienced these things.” “Caught The Eye” “‘Caught The Eye’ is a song that’s dealing with just being aware of your surroundings. There’s a line in it, and it says, ‘Your body language is all remedial, how could you see the difference between you and I?’ Just being so sharp about your surroundings.” “4:44″ “‘4:44′ is a song that I wrote, and it’s the crux of the album, just right in the middle of the album. And I woke up, literally, at 4:44 in the morning, 4:44 AM, to write this song. So it became the title of the album and everything. It’s the title track because it’s such a powerful song, and I just believe one of the best songs I’ve ever written.” “Family Feud” “‘Family Feud’ is about separation within the culture. Like, new rappers fighting with old rappers, saying all these things. So, the line is, ‘Nobody wins when the family feuds.'” “Bam” “The song ‘Bam’ with Damian Marley it’s just jammin’, it’s just like the song. But it’s secretly Shawn Carter saying, ‘Man, you need a bit of ego.’ It was because of me and the things that I’ve done, this is Jay-Z saying you needed a bit of ego for us to arrive at this point.” “Moonlight” “The hook is ‘We stuck in La La Land/Even if we win, we gonna lose.’ It’s like a subtle nod to La La Land winning the Oscar, and then having to give it to Moonlight. It’s really a commentary on the culture and where we’re going.” “Marcy Me” “‘Marcy Me’ is a nostalgic walk through Marcy, and it’s about that hopefulness, that feeling of ‘Man, can I really do this? Can I really be one of the biggest artists in the world?’ You have these dreams, ‘Can I be one of the biggest basketball players?’ We have these dreams.” “Legacy” “The song is just about what it is, it’s like a verbal will. Just a song about speaking to my daughter. She starts the song off, and she says ‘Daddy, what’s a will?’

Snoop Dogg: Neva Left
Snoop Dogg, a veritable living legend who has a classic discography that has garnered himself multi-platinum sales, Grammy nominations, critical acclaim and more is releasing his new project, “Neva Left”. Perhaps more recently known as a pop icon, Snoop reminds us that he has Neva Left and hits us with 16 hard-hitting tracks plus a CD only bonus track that features the likes of Too $hort, Redman, Method Man, Wiz Khalifa, KRS-One, K Camp, and more.

Radiohead: OKNOTOK 1997-2017
remastered and expanded 20th Anniversary two CD edition. Rescued from defunct formats, prized from dark cupboards and brought to light after two decades in cold storage… OKNOTOK features the original OK Computer twelve track album, eight B-sides, and the Radiohead completist’s dream: “I Promise,” “Lift,” and “Man Of War.” The original studio recordings of these three previously unreleased and long sought after OK Computer era tracks finally receive their first official issue on OKNOTOK. All material on OKNOTOK is newly remastered from the original analogue tapes. OK Computer was originally released on various dates ranging from May to July 1997. Produced by the band and Nigel Godrich, the album is widely cited as one of the greatest works of Radiohead’s-or any artist’s-catalogue and was the first Radiohead record to reach #1 in the UK and to be be nominated for the Album of the Year Grammy. The album features singles “Paranoid Android,” “Karma Police,” “Lucky” and “No Surprises.” In 2015, The National Recording Registry selected OK COMPUTER to be preserved in the Library of Congress as a recording that has proven “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant.”

Haim: Something To Tell You
the highly anticipated sophomore album from HAIM. When the time came to record the eleven tracks that make up Something To Tell You, HAIM decided to “go in and record as a band, keeping it a little more organic. That was kind of a mission statement for the album” offered Danielle HAIM. Includes the singles ‘Want You Back’ and ‘Right Now’. HAIM consists of three sisters: Este HAIM (bass), Danielle HAIM (guitars and lead vocals), and Alana HAIM (guitars and keyboards), as well as drummer Dash Hutton. In addition to their primary instruments, each member is also proficient in several others. The group’s pop sound on their studio work stands in contrast to the more rock-based music of their live shows.

Decapitated: Anticult
the seventh album from the Polish metal band. The opening track on Anticult, has an ominous voice to it. The clean guitar motif feels dangerous, as if warning in a language unfamiliar that the world before us will soon not be the same. Certainly, trail-blazing masterpiece “Impulse” is the harbinger of change. The ceaseless assault of riffs, drums, bass, and vocals-expertly delivered by guitarist Waclaw ‘Vogg’ Kieltyka, drummer Michal Lysejko, bassist Hubert Wiecek, and vocalist Rafał ‘Rasta’ Piotrowski-is unlike anything before it. But “Impulse” is more than the sum of it’s parts. Between Vogg’s monstrous volleys and Rasta’s brutal existentialist barks, there’s something else in the mix. Not just Decapitated’s penchant for building tension by continually winding up and layering upon themes either. That’s a trademark harkening all the back to 2000’s classically-inspired Winds of Creation full-length. On “Impulse” (and definitely throughout the rest of Anticult), Decapitated weave in thrusts of brightness. Turns out, Anticult was designed-with an almost devil may care attitude-that way from the start. While Blood Mantra may’ve taken Decapitated all over the world, exposed hordes of new fans to the Poles, and opened a few new doors, the Krosno-based quartet are confident Anticult will raise their profile even more, allowing Decapitated to tour with just about anybody. It’s got the songs. Tracks like “Impulse”, “One Eye Nation”, and “Never” are guaranteed to hook fans from any genre of metal.

Broken Social Scene: Hug of Thunder
Hug Of Thunder marks the fifth studio album from Canadian alt-rock supergroup Broken Social Scene, their first in seven years. Hug Of Thunder was produced by Joe Chiccarelli (White Stripes, Spoon, The Strokes) with Nyles Spencer, and mixed by Shawn Everett (Alabama Shakes, Weezer). Founded in ’99 by Kevin Drew and Brendan Canning, the album features 17 players and 15 original members including Emily Haines and Jimmy Shaw of Metric, Amy Millan and Evan Cranley of Stars, Charles Spearin and Ohad Benchetrit of Do Make Say Think, and Grammy-nominated Leslie Feist. Hug Of Thunder is everything BSS fans love from the Canadian collective and then some, an album overflowing with glorious open chords, multi-voice harmonies, spacious psychedelia-tinted breakdowns, and more. It is a panoramic, expansive album that manages to be both epic and intimate; and like all things BSS, in troubled times, it offers a serotonin rush of positivity. Since their inception in the early Aughts, BSS have always pushed sonic boundaries while remaining reverent of a perfect chorus; almost twenty years down the line, Hug Of Thunder sharpens that balance and then some. The record’s twelve songs refract the band’s varying emotions, methods, and techniques in ways that not only reference their other albums, but surpass them. Hug Of Thunder is righteous but warm, angry but loving, melodic but uncompromising. And if you’ve ever fallen in love with Broken Social Scene – as many of us have – it is a perfect return that was truly worth the wait.

Toro y Moi: Boo Boo
After 7 years of touring and recording, I found myself becoming self conscious about my position in life as a “famous” person, or at least my version of whatever that is. My dreams had become my reality, yet I was somehow unable to accept this new environment. I couldn’t help but fall into what might be described as an identity crisis. A feedback loop of fearful thoughts left me feeling confused. I felt as though I no longer knew what it was that I actually wanted and needed in and out of life, and at times I felt unable to even tell what was real. During this time of personal turmoil, I turned to music as a form of therapy, and it helped me cope with the pain that I was feeling. I’d listen to the same ambient song over and over again, trying to insulate myself from reality. I fell in love with space again. By the time I felt ready to begin working on a new record, I knew that this idea of space within music would be something that propelled my new work forward. The artists that were influencing what I was making included everyone from Travis Scott to Daft Punk, Frank Ocean to Oneohtrix Point Never, Kashif and Gigi Masin. I recognized that the common thread between these artists was their attention to a feeling of space, or lack thereof. I decided that I wanted to make a Pop record with these ideas in mind. That idea for a record is what eventually became Boo Boo.

Randall Bramblett : Juke Joint at the Edge of the World
“Plan B,” the opening track from Juke Joint at the Edge of the World, the 11th album by songwriter and multi-instrumentalist Randall Bramblett, serves as a kind of anthemic hub that the rest of the record turns on. Its distorted drum loop, syncopated dubwise bassline, and reggae rhythms meeting jump blues with fuzzed-out electric piano and filthy electric guitars deliver a narrative about being broken down in the middle of nowhere with only a half pint for company in an empty bus station. Bramblett’s response to his troubles: “Might be a fool but at least I’m free/That’s why they love me, I got no Plan B.” This set was cut with his road band, whose members have done their share of steamy Southern nights in clubs in out-of-the-way places, and it unfolds accordingly. Nine of these ten songs are tales of people and places in marginal and often risky circumstances. The musical approach is lean, mean, and greasy. Bramblett’s group gets that, rocking and focusing on attack and sharpness rather than nuance. The band stays away from studio slickness, preferring murk and atmosphere. Check the grimy, sweaty, funky blues of “Pot Hole on Main Street,” the rambling second-line funk of “Garbage Man,” the chord-drenched R&B of “Fine.” Bramblett’s lyrics in these tunes are full of wonderfully seedy imagery as they celebrate the seamy side of life. But this set is not just drunken late-night party jams; there are some wonderfully strange surprises for balance. “Trippy Little Thing” is where psychedelia, funk-blues, and African rhythms swirl in a night vision. The single “I Just Don’t Have the Time” is a Chicago-styled blues strut with a half-rapped lyric full of wit, irony, and sarcasm worthy of both Mose Allison and Ben Sidran. The droning, slightly psychedelized ballad “Since You’re Gone” is one of the most moving things Bramblett’s ever written; its imagery and delivery are every bit as evocative as Tom Waits. “Mali Katra” is Afro-funk soldered onto Middle Eastern modalism framing wiry guitar rock, jazz keyboards, and a poetic lyric. The lone cover is a ragged, shuffling, gutbucket read of Beck’s “Devil’s Haircut.” Double-timed snares, fat swinging horns, and wonky organ underscore the tune’s instantly recognizable guitar riff — which is pushed to surf overdrive here. Bramblett’s vocal performance equates the meaning in these lyrics with his own “Plan B,” making the two tunes seem like perverse companions. Juke Joint at the Edge of the World extends the direction pursued on 2015’s Devil Music, but it’s more consistent and less indulgent and frenetic, while simultaneously being more loose and musically adventurous. This is Bramblett and band doing nothing more than getting good songs across with the grit and immediacy they would get in a club — and that’s plenty.

Steve Vai: Modern Primitive
This 13 track album is the 7th installment in the Secret Jewel Box and will be highly sought after from Steve Vai fans all over the world. There are only several thousand copies of this record are being made which makes this an instant collectors item! This version of Modern Primitive package has been modified specifically as a collectors item for the Steve Vai Secret Jewel Box

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