NEW RELEASES for March 9, 2018 include:

Jimi Hendrix: Both Sides of the Sky

Both Sides Of The Sky presents 13 studio recordings including 10 which have never before been released. All but two of these studio recordings were made during a fertile two year period between January 1968 and 1970. Jimi’s mastery of the studio and his increasing use of them as a proving ground for new songs resulted in a growing collection of extraordinary material. Both Sides Of The Sky completes a trilogy of albums [with Valleys Of Neptune and People, Hell & Angels] intended to present the best and most significant unissued studio recordings remaining in the Hendrix archive. The songs include fascinating alternate versions of “Stepping Stone,” “Lover Man” and “Hear My Train A Comin’” as well as recordings where Jimi is joined by such special guests as Johnny Winter and Stephen Stills. Both Sides Of The Sky was mixed by Eddie Kramer, the engineer for all of Hendrix’s albums throughout the guitarist’s lifetime, and produced by Janie Hendrix, Kramer and John McDermott.

Track synopsis’:

  • Mannish Boy – The first ever studio session by the group Hendrix would christen as his Band Of Gypsys. Hendrix, Cox & Miles shared a love for the blues as this driving, uptempo reworking of “Mannish Boy” by Muddy Waters makes clear.
  • Lover Man – Just two weeks before their triumphant New Year’s concerts at the Fillmore East in NYC [yielding both 1970’s Band Of Gypsys and 2016’s sequel Machine Gun], Hendrix gathered with Cox and Miles to cut this dynamic rendition of what had become a favorite concert staple.
  • Stepping Stone – A totally unique take on this Hendrix favorite, with Jimi showcasing both blues and country styled licks atop a relentless, galloping beat.
  • $20 Fine -Stephen Stills joined Jimi, Mitch Mitchell and Buddy Miles Express keyboardist Duane Hitchings at this September 1969 session. With Stephen handling lead vocals and organ, Jimi added multiple guitar parts to this rollicking Stills original.
  • Power Of Soul – This 1970 studio session came three weeks after the Band Of Gypsys concerts at the Fillmore East. While a live version remains one of the highpoints of Band Of Gypsys, Jimi never released a studio version during his lifetime. For this album, we present the mix that Hendrix and Kramer prepared of the complete song at Electric Lady on August 22, 1970.
  • Jungle – The influence of Curtis Mayfield can be heard here as Jimi expands on the “Villanova Junction Blues” theme he made famous by its inclusion in the 1970 Woodstock documentary.
  • Things I Used To Do – Jimi is joined for this rendition of Guitar Slim’s blues classic by Johnny Winter. Jimi’s trademark guitar work and Winter’s deft slide playing weaves in and around the foundation set by bassist Billy Cox and Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young drummer Dallas Taylor.
  • Georgia Blues – Jimi reunited with some old friends from his pre-Experience days. Lonnie Youngblood, with whom Hendrix played in R&B groups like Curtis Knight & The Squires, voiced this superb twelve bar blues neatly underpinned by Hendrix’s sublime rhythm and lead guitar work.
  • Sweet Angel – With Axis: Bold As Love only just released, Jimi immediately turned his focus to recording what would become Electric Ladyland. This gorgeous, instrumental reading of “Angel,”, features Jimi on guitar, bass and vibraphone joined by Mitch Mitchell.
  • Woodstock – Stephen Stills came to this session fresh from having visited Joni Mitchell, who had a new song that Stills was excited to try and record. Long before CSNY’s version, Stephen, Jimi and Buddy Miles recorded this amazing rendition.
  • Send My Love To Linda – A superb new Hendrix original composition recorded with Cox and Miles in the aftermath of their successful Band Of Gypsys performances at the Fillmore East.
  • Cherokee Mist – Together with drummer Mitch Mitchell, Jimi created this moody, evocative original complete with his playing of a sitar to complement his traditional electric guitar.

David Byrne: American Utopia

from the veteran singer/songwriter and former Talking Heads frontman. American Utopia fits hand-in-hand with Byrne’s vision for his series Reasons To Be Cheerful, named for the song by the late Ian Dury. Over the last year, Byrne has been collecting stories, news, ideas, and other items that all either embody or identify examples of things that inspire optimism, such as a tech breakthrough, a musical act, a new idea in urban planning or transportation-something seen, heard, or tasted. Just as the album questions the current state of society while offering solace through song, the content of the series recognizes the darkness and complexity of today while showcasing alternatives to the despair that threatens us. – While David Byrne has collaborated on joint releases with Eno, Norman Cook (AKA Fatboy Slim), and most recently St. Vincent over the past decade, American Utopia is Byrne’s first solo album since, 2004’s Grown Backwards, also on Nonesuch. American Utopia morphed during the writing and recording process, beginning with longtime collaborator Eno, and eventually growing to include collaboration with producer Rodaidh McDonald (The xx, King Krule, Sampha, Savages) alongside a diverse cast of creative contributors including Daniel Lopatin (AKA Oneohtrix Point Never), Jam City, Thomas Bartlett (St. Vincent producer, AKA Doveman), Jack Peñate, and others. The album was recorded in New York City at David’s home studio, Reservoir Studios, Oscilloscope, XL Studios, and Crowdspacer Studio and in London at Livingston Studio 1.

Nathaniel Rateliff & the Night Sweats: Tearing At The Seams

Nathaniel Rateliff & the Night Sweats make their long-awaited return with Tearing At The Seams, a staggering album of rock ‘n’ soul music. Propelled by driving rhythms, blazing hornplay, and Rateliff’s rowdy, soul drenched vocals, Tearing At The Seams’ 12 tracks crackle with emotion and intensity. From anguished sorrow to ecstatic heights, Rateliff’s expressive tenor is unvarnished on the record’s tender R&B ballads and nitro-fueled rave-ups. Features “Be There,” “A Little Honey,” “Say It Louder,” “Hey Mama,” “Babe I Know,” “You Worry Me,” the title track and more. Nathaniel Rateliff is a singer and songwriter based in Denver, whose influences are described as folk, Americana and vintage rhythm & blues.

Brad Mehldau: After Bach

After Bach comprises Brad Mehldau’s recordings of four preludes and one fugue from J.S. Bach’s Well-Tempered Clavier, each followed by an After Bach piece written by Mehldau and inspired by it’s WTC mate. “There have always been elements of Mehldau’s style that recall Bach,” writes Timo Andres in the liner note. “After Bach surveys their shared ground as keyboardists, improvisers, and composers, making implicit parallels explicit.”

Judas Priest: Firepower

the 18th album from the legendary British heavy metal band. Firepower is something these heavy-metal pioneers have never lacked-and they sound as explosive as ever on this studio album. Guitarist Glenn Tipton and bassist Ian Hill have been with Rob Halford since ’74; they’re joined by second guitarist Richie Faulkner and drummer Scott Travis here plus producer Tom Allom (who helmed all of the band’s 1979-88 releases). Grammy-winning producer Andy Sneap joined that team for this recording, bringing a modern flair to Tom’s throwback metal approach. The songs are vintage Priest, and the band recorded ’em the old way, just getting in a room together and blasting through “Firepower,” “Lightning Strike,” “Evil Never Dies,” “Necromancer,” “Flame Thrower” and more.


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