NEW RELEASES for March 2018 include

Jack White: Boarding House Reach

BOARDING HOUSE REACH is the new solo album from Jack White, and is a testament to the breadth of the artist’s creative power and his bold artistic ambition. This new material finds Jack White expanding his musical palate with perhaps his most ambitious work thus far, a collection of songs that are simultaneously timeless and modern. Written and conceived while holed up in a spartan apartment with literally no outside world distractions, White exclusively used the same kind of gear he had when he was 15 years old (a quarter-inch four-track tape recorder, a simple mixer, and the most basic of instrumentation). The album explores a remarkable range of sonic terrain — crunching rock ‘n’ roll, electro and hard funk, proto punk, hip hop, gospel blues, and even country — all remapped and born anew to fit White’s matchless vision and sense of restless experimentation.
BOARDING HOUSE REACH was produced by Jack White III and recorded at Third Man Studio in Nashville, TN, Sear Sound in New York, NY, and Capitol Studios in Los Angeles, CA. The album was mixed by Bill Skibbe, Joshua V. Smith, and White at Third Man Studio in Nashville, TN. The album features White on vocals, acoustic and electric guitars and drums, organ, and synthesizers. He’s backed by a remarkable new lineup of musicians that includes: drummer Louis Cato (Beyoncé, Q-Tip, John Legend, Mariah Carey), bassists Charlotte Kemp Muhl (The Ghost of a Saber Tooth Tiger) and NeonPhoenix (Kanye West, Lil Wayne, Jay-Z), synthesizer players DJ Harrison and Anthony “Brew” Brewster (Fishbone, The Untouchables), keyboardists Neal Evans (Soulive, Talib Kweli, John Scofield) and Quincy McCrary (Unknown Mortal Orchestra, Pitbull), percussionists Bobby Allende (David Byrne, Marc Anthony) and Justin Porée (Ozomatli), and backing vocalists Esther Rose and Ann & Regina McCrary of Nashville’s beloved gospel trio, The McCrary Sisters, as well as longtime collaborators like drummers Daru Jones (Nas, Talib Kweli) and Carla Azar (Autolux, Depeche Mode, Doyle Bramhall II). Singer-songwriter C.W. Stoneking also appears, contributing a stirring spoken word performance to the album’s “Abulia and Akrasia.”
Jack White is a 12-time GRAMMY® Award-winner and 35-time nominee. His most recent full-length release, 2016’s JACK WHITE ACOUSTIC RECORDINGS: 1998-2016 (Third Man Records/Columbia), collected 26 acoustic-based songs from throughout White’s wide-ranging musical career, spanning album tracks, B-sides, remixes, alternate versions, and previously unreleased material from The White Stripes, The Raconteurs, and White’s groundbreaking solo career. The collection debuted at #1 on Billboard’s “Vinyl Albums” chart upon its September 2016 release – a position also achieved by 2012’s RIAA gold certified solo debut, BLUNDERBUSS, and 2014’s chart-topping LAZARETTO, both of which debuted at #1 on the Billboard Top 200 as well.


The Decemberists: I’ll Be Your Girl

The Decemberists explore a new sound on their inspired eighth studio album I’ll Be Your Girl. The acclaimed Portland, Oregon-based band worked with producer John Congleton (St. Vincent, Lana del Ray) and embraced influences such as Roxy Music and New Order to spark a new creative path, as evidenced on synth-driven lead single “Severed.” I’ll Be Your Girl is the band’s first studio album since 2015’s What a Terrible World, What a Beautiful World. In addition to their lyrics, which often focus on historical incidents and/or folklore, The Decemberists are also well known for their eclectic live shows. Audience participation is a part of each performance, typically during encores. The band stages whimsical reenactments of sea battles and other centuries-old events, typically of regional interest, or acts out songs with members of the crowd.



Chris Smither: Call Me Lucky
A new Chris Smither album is always an event and this one is no exception with its eight new original Smither songs and three covers – Chuck Berry’s “Maybelline”; “Sitting On Top of the World” by The Mississippi Shieks and “She Said She Said” by The Beatles. There are two CDs – the first one with the eight new songs and the three covers and the second (the ‘B side’) contains different versions of five of the new songs.


Paul Thorn: Don’t Let The Devil Ride

Don’t Let the Devil Ride collects soulful songs originally cut by black southern gospel groups, and features guests Blind Boys of Alabama, the McCrary Sisters, the Preservation Hall Jazz Horns, and Bonnie Bishop. The album was recorded at three temples of sound: the Sam C. Phillips Recording studio, whose namesake gave another son of Tupelo his start; at FAME Studios in Muscle Shoals, where Thorn worked as a songwriter for legendary producer Rick Hall early in his career; and at Preservation Hall, where horn players from the celebrated jazz venue lent songs a New Orleans vibe. Few of the songs here are well known. Billy Maddox, album co-producer, found most of them while digging through releases from small gospel labels in Mississippi and Alabama. The most familiar track here is no doubt Thorn’s relaxed tempo version of the O’Jays “Love Train,” a song whose feel-good qualities readily adapt to a gospel setting. The new release marks Thorn’s first time recording gospel music, after a dozen albums in roots-rock mode, though his upbringing has previously been reflected in his creation of a body of strikingly original songs. The other songs stretch back much farther, but their themes – of redemption, taking stock of one’s life, and resilience in the face of troubles – are universal, making them readily adaptable to the fresh takes here.


Best Of The Grateful Dead Live: 1969-1977

Two CD set. Made for die-hard Dead Heads and new fans alike, The Best Of The Grateful Dead Live is the ultimate live collection. Includes recordings selected from the band’s official live albums on Warner Bros. And Arista, plus a few tracks from their many archival live releases, beginningwith “St. Stephen” -from the group’s first official live album, 1969’sLive/Dead- and ending with the poignant “So Many Roads, ” taken from the band’s final concert at Chicago’s Soldier Field in July of 1995.


Wynton Marsalis: United We Swing

Recorded between 2003 and 2007, United We Swing finds an unparalleled array of musical talent that collectively boasts 94 Grammy Awards joining Jazz at Lincoln Center Managing and Artistic Director Wynton Marsalis (a nine-time Grammy Award winner himself) and his Septet. Together, they perform blues-inflected versions of iconic American repertoire and celebrate the red, white, and Blues. These one-night-only, live performances have never been released before. They include Lenny Kravitz performing Marsalis’s hypnotizing, New Orleans-inflected arrangement of Kravitz’s own song, “Are You Gonna Go My Way”; Susan Tedeschi and Derek Trucks uniting for a stirring, infectious take on Civil Rights anthem “I Wish I Knew How It Would Feel to Be Free”; Bob Dylan adding harmonica licks to a deeply felt, in-the-pocket rendition of “It Takes a Lot to Laugh, It Takes a Train to Cry”; and Ray Charles taking the stage for one of his final performances to play “I’m Gonna Move to the Outskirts of Town.” Together these artists raise their voices to highlight jazz’s importance to America’s cultural heritage and to remind us that, even in divided times, music can unite us all. All proceeds from the album will go toward Jazz at Lincoln Center’s education programs, which introduce thousands of children to jazz each year.

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