New Releases for April 2018 (out now)

Save this date:

Saturday April 21: Record Store Day

The Special Releases will blow your mind.
Could be best RSD yet…

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NEW RELEASES for April 2018 (out now) include:


Kacey Musgrave: Golden Hour
the fourth album from country music singer/songwriter Kacey Musgraves. Kacey describes this album as having a “trippy” twist, citing the Bee Gees, Sade, and Neil Young as influences. In addition to reuniting with previous collaborators such as Luke Laird, Shane McAnally, and Natalie Hemby, Musgraves sought out pals Ian Fitchuk and the Silver Seas’ Daniel Tashian as her primary co-producers and co-writers. Musgraves wrote and recorded most of the songs from the album throughout 2017; about the writing process she said: “I have a lot more love songs this time around, and I’ve never been one to write a love song and really feel it,”. She continued: “That probably sounds like the most depressing thing ever. [But] I’m coming off getting married and being in this golden hour of my personal life, where all these things are finally coming to fruition. I found myself inspired to write about this person and all these things he brought out in me that weren’t there before”.



Mary Chapin Carpenter: Sometimes Just The Sky
Sometimes Just the Sky is not a greatest hits endeavor or a remastered compilation. It’s not a celebration or a souvenir. It is a reimagining of a most unusual nature. It is a collection of songs written across the decades, recorded in bucolic western England at Real World Studios with the great producer Ethan Johns. Carpenter sat with new and old friends who circled together in a wooden room and made music, in real time. What we hear is precisely what was played and sung, all at once. There’s a song originally recorded for each of Carpenter’s original studio records, and then there’s a new song, which was aided and abetted by hillside contemplation and a punk poet’s advice.



Ben Harper and Charlie Musselwhite: No Mercy In This Land
No Mercy In This Land is a blues record by Ben Harper and Charlie Musselwhite. Charlie Musselwhite and Ben Harper were introduced to one another by John Lee Hooker. The legendary musician thought the two men should play together, so he brought them into the studio to record a song called simply “Burnin’ Hell.” The two remained friends and their paths periodically crossed out there on the road. But it wasn’t until 2013 that the two met up in a studio to record what would be their Grammy winning album Get Up!. And as good as that record was, it was just the beginning. Both men agree that their friendship deepened in the many months of touring that followed. And it’s that bond, that closeness, that makes this new record something special. At first glance, Ben Harper and Charlie Musselwhite might seem an unlikely pairing. While Ben grew up in in the tree lined Southern California college town of Claremont, a bastion of culture and liberalism just east of Los Angeles, Charlie was raised in Memphis during the time of rockabilly and Sun Records. But while the two might have come to their musical knowledge in different eras and places, as Charlie explains, “We were both searchers and we’re still seeking.” Each of them possess an enduring hunger for musical knowledge that came to them early.



Bettye LaVette: Things Have Changed
For her tenth album and first album on a major label in nearly fifty years, legendary soul singer Bettye LaVette takes on the songs of Bob Dylan with the grit and experience that makes her one of the greatest soul singers alive. Things Have Changed is a masterpiece of interpretation of one of the greatest songwriters alive, by one of the greatest soul singers alive. Produced by Steve Jordan, the album spans Dylan’s catalogue and features guest appearances by Keith Richards and Trombone Shorty.



JOHNNY CASH: FOREVER WORDS
For nearly 60 years, the words of Johnny Cash have reached across cultural, spiritual and ideological borders. He was not only a singer of great songs, but a teller of universal hard truths about justice, faith and independence. It is in this spirit the new album, JOHNNY CASH: FOREVER WORDS, was created.
When Johnny Cash and June Carter Cash passed, they left behind what their son and JOHNNY CASH: FOREVER WORDS producer, John Carter Cash, describes as a “monstrous amassment of ‘things’” which included his father’s handwritten letters, poems and documents, ranging through the entirety of his life.
Over the past two years, a stellar cast of contemporary artists were invited by John Carter Cash to create new music to accompany these newly discovered Cash writings. These artists have adapted his words honestly and uniquely as they see fit, further showcasing the diversity and universality of Johnny Cash as a writer and storyteller.

  • Album of Johnny Cash’s unknown poetry, lyrics, and letters set to music by an astounding array of contemporary artists
  • Recorded primarily at the Cash Cabin in Hendersonville, TN and produced by Johnny Cash and June Carter Cash’s son, John Carter Cash and Steve Berkowitz
  • Includes recordings by Ruston Kelly & Kacey Musgraves, Chris Cornell, Rosanne Cash, Alison Krauss & Union Station, Kris Kristofferson & Willie Nelson, Brad Paisley, John Mellencamp, Elvis Costello, and more
  • Follows the bestselling book, JOHNNY CASH – FOREVER WORDS: THE UNKNOWN POEMS

Among the featured artists on JOHNNY CASH: FOREVER WORDS:

  • Ruston Kelly & Kacey Musgraves : The real-life couple and newlyweds record, “To June This Morning,” a song with lyrics taken from an actual letter Johnny Cash wrote to his wife, June Carter Cash.
  • Chris Cornell: 21 years after Cash released a cover of Soundgarden’s “Rusty Cage” for the Grammy-Award winning album Unchained, Cornell comes full circle, setting some of Cash’s own poignant and introspective words to original music on “You Never Knew My Mind,” one of his last solo recordings.
  • Rosanne Cash: Cash’s eldest daughter interprets her father’s “The Walking Wounded,” marking only the second time she has collaborated with her half-brother, John Carter Cash.
  • Alison Krauss & Union Station: The Grammy Award winning bluegrass group releases “The Captain’s Daughter,” their first new studio recording together in six years.
  • Kris Kristofferson & Willie Nelson: The American music icons and lifelong friends of Cash open the album with “Forever / I Still Miss Someone” featuring Kristofferson reciting the last poem Cash ever wrote, alongside Nelson’s unmistakable acoustic guitar accompaniment.

Last fall, the publication of the best-selling Johnny Cash – FOREVER WORDS: THE UNKNOWN POEMS (Blue Rider Press) added a new layer to The Man in Black’s artistic influence. This collection of never-before-published poems, edited and introduced by Pulitzer Prize-winning poet Paul Muldoon, gave the reader



Elvis Presley: The Searcher
features 18 tracks including familiar hit recordings (“Heartbreak Hotel,” “Are You Lonesome Tonight?”), powerful vocal performances (“That’s All Right,” “Tomorrow Is a Long Time,” “Trouble/Guitar Man”) and rare outtakes (“Suspicious Minds,” “Separate Ways”). Original soundtrack to the multi-part 2018 documentary Elvis Presley: The Searcher, directed by Thom Zimny and airing on HBO. The Searcher pushes past the larger-than-life image of The King of Rock and Roll, portraying him instead as a man and an artist “who wanted to heal, to find that thing that was always felt to be missing, and to do it through the music.”



The Weeknd: My Dear Melancholy
My Dear Melancholy, is the first extended play (EP) by Canadian singer and songwriter The Weeknd. It has been referred to alternatively as an album and a mini-album, and was released on March 30, 2018, by XO and Republic Records. Primarily produced by Frank Dukes, who serves as an executive producer alongside The Weeknd, it features contributions from Gesaffelstein, as well as DaHeala, Mike Will Made It, Skrillex and Daft Punk’s Guy-Manuel de Homem-Christo, among others. The project has been described as a return to the darker style of The Weeknd’s earlier work, such as Trilogy and Kiss Land.



John Prine: The Tree of Forgiveness
Highly-anticipated 2018 album from the veteran singer/songwriter. The Tree of Forgiveness is Prine’s first collection of new material since 2005’s Grammy-winning Fair and Square. Prine teamed with Grammy-winning producer Dave Cobb to record in Nashville’s historic Studio A, enlisting friends like Brandi Carlile, Jason Isbell, and Amanda Shires to sing along. The songs are new, although some had waited to be finished for decades, like a co-write with Phil Spectro called “God Only Knows.” Another incomplete song, “I Have Met My Love Today,” now celebrates the unexpected spark that leads to lifelong romance – with a dash of youthful innocence. The musical arrangements may be simpler than on past efforts, yet his unique ability to distill complex emotions into everyday language remains fully intact. Rather than going out on a limb, Prine cultivated the themes that have brought international acclaim since the 1970s. For example, he can take a topic like loneliness and make it funny or heartbreaking.



Beth Hart: Front and Center
Taking it’s name from Public Television’s acclaimed concert series “Front and Center” (which featured this performance), this live release arrives 13 years after Beth’s highly prized release “Live at Paradiso.” Her soulful burnt-honey vocals are in peak form as you watch this set at the Iridium in NYC: “Let’s Get Together,” “Baddest Blues,” “Jazz Man,” “Leave the Light On,” “Can’t Let Go” and more. You get a bonus CD of the concert, and the DVD adds songs not seen in the PBS broadcast plus an interview with Beth! Provogue.



Laura Veirs: The Lookout
A prolific songwriter for over 20 years now, Laura Veirs proves the depth of her musical skill on her tenth solo album, The Lookout. Here is a batch of inimitable, churning, exquisite folk-pop songs; a conceptual album about the fragility of precious things. Produced by Grammy-nominated Tucker Martine, Veirs’ longtime collaborator, The Lookout is a soundtrack for turbulent times, full of allusions to protectors: the camper stoking a watch fire, a mother tending her children, a sailor in a crows nest and a lightning rod channeling energy. The Lookout draws on the talents of a time-tested crew of musicians: Karl Blau, Steve Moore, Eli Moore, Eyvind Kang and Martine. Says Veirs, “These guys are a good hang, ego-free and wonderful players who just want to serve the songs.” Sufjan Stevens and Jim James provide guest vocals. For Martine, who fell, almost two decades ago, for Veirs’ unique sound after listening to a tape cassette she’d sent him in the mail, this album reflects a bar that keeps getting raised. Both familiar and strange, The Lookout gets better with repeated listens, warming to the skin like a cherished saddlebag, critical for the journey ahead.



The Nels Cline 4 : Currents, Constellations
Following the release of Nels Cline’s expansive Blue Note debut Lovers which found him fronting a 23-piece ensemble arranged by Michael Leonhart, the Wilco guitarist pares it down to The Nels Cline 4 for his project Currents, Constellations. The album features Cline alongside fellow guitarist and frequent collaborator Julian Lage, bassist Scott Colley, and drummer Tom Rainey on a set of seven Cline originals plus one piece by composer Carla Bley. Nels Cline first came to prominence in the 1980s playing jazz, often in collaboration with his twin brother Alex Cline, a drummer. Since then, he has worked with a wide range of musicians in punk and alternative rock, notably Mike Watt and Thurston Moore.

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