NEW RELEASES OUT August 23 (now):


The Best Taylor Swift album EVER



Raphael Saadiq: Jimmy Lee
is the new album from Raphael Saadiq, the Grammy Award- winning musician, songwriter and go-to collaborator/producer Raphael Saadiq. This collection is Raphael’s first new album in eight years, and is the follow-up to 2011’s Stone Rollin.’ The album was announced in June, 2019 with the release of the single “Something Keeps Calling.”
Jimmy Lee is a deeply personal, musically ambitious work inspired by his brother’s struggles with addiction that explores the razor’s edge people walk as they pursue pleasure that leads to pain — a brilliantly incisive and empathetic work from a master at the peak of his art. The album takes the listener from Saadiq’s native Oakland to Rikers Island as he traces the everyday struggles of addiction and incarceration, taking in both the thrills and pitfalls he witnessed throughout his brother’s life. Comprising narcotic funk, steely gospel affirmations, and quaking protest soul, Jimmy Lee is a resonant examination of modern life, in all its exuberance, destruction and consequence.
Jimmy Lee was self-produced by Raphael Saadiq and recorded at Blakeslee Recording Co. in North Hollywood. The album features contributions from Brook D’Leau, Kendrick Lamar, and Ali Shaheed Muhammad.
Raphael Saadiq came up in the 80s and 90s with the multi-platinum R&B group Tony! Toni! Toné! before embarking on a critically acclaimed solo career. He also has been active as a producer, co-writing career-defining hits for D’Angelo (“Untitled (How Does It Feel)”) and Solange (“Cranes in the Sky”) and working with artists like John Legend, Mary J. Blige, Snoop Dogg, Erykah Badu, Lady Gaga and Stevie Wonder.



Tyler, The Creator: Igor
is the fifth studio album by rapper Tyler, The Creator. Produced entirely by Tyler, the album follows the 2017 release of Flower Boy. It features guest appearances from Playboi Carti, Lil Uzi Vert, Solange, Kanye West, and Jerrod Carmichael, along with backing vocals from Santigold, Jessy Wilson, La Roux, CeeLo Green, Charlie Wilson, Slowthai, and Pharrell, among others. Igor received widespread critical acclaim from critics and debuted at #1 on the US Billboard 200, becoming Tyler’s first chart topper.



Redd Kross: Beyond the Door
Redd Kross invite you to explore Beyond the Door, an album inspired by the band’s “total commitment to having the best fucking time we can have while we’re all still here” (what they like to call “the Party”). It’s a rock and roll record and a celebration of everything brothers Jeff and Steven McDonald love, from cultures both high and low. Musically, it’s guitars, bass, and drums topped with a generous portion of sweet vocal melodies often delivered with an ambiguous edge.



Robert Randolph and the Family Band: Brighter Days
the follow-up to the Grammy-nominated Got Soul album, may be Robert Randolph and the Family Band’s best, most diverse album yet. Rooted in gospel and blues, and branching into rock and soul, it is the sound of a veteran artist sure of himself and confident enough to spread his wings. The album was produced by Dave Cobb, known for his acclaimed and award-winning production of albums by Chris Stapleton, Jason Isbell, Brandi Carlile, and the A Star Is Born soundtrack.



Coco Montoya: Coming in Hot
Premiere blues rock guitarist Montoya is the only one of his peers with the soulful vocals to match his six-string prowess. Coming In Hot is jam-packed with stellar, unpredictable, spiraling solos played with Coco’s signature full-bodied tone, and singing that carries fury and passion equal to his powerhouse fretwork.



Vince Gill : Okie
With the album’s title and varied themes, Gill helps Merle Haggard and other inspirations reclaim “Okie,” a term used in the past to disparage Oklahoma natives living on the West Coast during the Dust Bowl and Great Depression years. For Gill, a proud Oklahoman, it now applies to common folks with specific fears and triumphs that are broadly relatable to listeners well beyond the Sooner State.
“I thought this was going to be a songwriter record, not a concept album,” Gill says in a press release. “It wound up being more information than I’d envisioned. A friend sent me an email saying, ‘You could have only written this record after living a 60-year-plus life.’ He said, ‘There’s no struggle in these songs, just truth and your experience.'”
A Letter to My Mama, the album’s lead release, applies Gill’s acoustic-driven, sentimental style to a nod to country music’s time-tested themes of faith, family and home. Readers can press play above to hear the song.



Tanya Tucker: While I’m Livin’
the first album in 17 years from legendary country icon Tanya Tucker. The album was produced by Brandi Carlile and Shooter Jennings.



Slipknot:We Are Not Your Kind
is the sixth studio album by metal band Slipknot. The album was produced by Greg Fidelman. We Are Not Your Kind is the band’s first album in five years. Includes the lead single “Unsainted”. This is the band’s first album since the firing of longtime member Chris Fehn.



Blinded By The Light
Original soundtrack to the 2019 motion picture. Blinded By The Light brings together 12 essential Bruce Springsteen performances ranging from greatest hits and fan favorites (“Born To Run, ” “Dancing In The Dark, ” “Hungry Heart, ” “Because The Night”) to previously unreleased tracks, including the long-sought-after studio recording of “I’ll Stand By You.” Also, for the first time on album, Blinded By The Light: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack presents two live rarities: the debut live performance of “The River” (from No Nukes ’79 – Madison Square Garden, NYC – September 21, 1979) and an unforgettable acoustic solo performance of “The Promised Land” (Concert for Valor – The National Mall, Washington DC, November 11, 2014). In addition to the Springsteen performances, Blinded By The Light: Original Motion Picture Soundtrack includes period tracks and dialog from the film and premieres “For You My Love, ” a new song written for the film by soundtrack composer A.R. Rahman (“Slumdog Millionaire”). Rahman has won six National Film Awards, two Academy Awards, two Grammy Awards, a BAFTA Award, a Golden Globe Award, fifteen Filmfare Awards and seventeen Filmfare Awards South. The film follows Javed (Viveik Kalra), a British teen of Pakistani descent, growing up in Luton, England in 1987. Javed’s turbulent life amidst the racial and economic turmoil of the times is transformed when he is introduced to the music of Bruce Springsteen.



Dirty Heads: Super Moon
the seventh album from Southern California-based alternative rock band Dirty Heads. The album was produced by four-time Grammy-winning Nashville, Tennessee-based super producer Dave Cobb (A Star is Born soundtrack, Brandi Carlile, Chris Stapleton, Jason Isbell, Sturgill Simpson). The album was all recorded live in the same room to tape in Studio A in the old RCA building in Nashville, Tennessee, where legends like Johnny Cash and Elvis recorded a lot of their work.



Marc Cohn & The Blind Boys of Alabama: Work To Do
a collaboration from critically acclaimed singer-songwriter Marc Cohn and gospel titans Blind Boys Of Alabama. Produced by John Leventhal, the unique collection combines the songwriting talents of Marc Cohn with the soul stirring harmonies of Blind Boys of Alabama and falls on the heels of more than a year of live collaborative dates. Work To Do is comprised of three studio tracks by Cohn and The Blind Boys, (two originals and a version of the gospel standard “Walking To Jerusalem”) and seven intimate live performances recorded at the Katharine Hepburn Cultural Arts Center in Old Saybrook, CT, during a taping of the PBS series The Kate.



Nick Moss Band: Lucky Guy !
Peerless Chicago blues band, led by razor-sharp singer/guitarist Nick Moss and harmonica virtuoso Dennis Gruenling, return with another sterling collection of combustible, cocksure blues and rootsy rock ‘n’ roll, genuine, deep and potent. Thirteen original songs featuring searing, tough vocals, blazing guitar and powerhouse harmonica. Up-to-the-minute lyrics melded with classic blues sounds.



Jesse Dayton: Mixtape Vol. 1
“If you open your arms to the world, it’s amazing what will come back atcha,” drawls East Texas native, singer/songwriter/filmmaker/author Jesse Dayton, who has a bunch more homespun wisdoms where that came from. A veteran of more than 30 years as a musician, Dayton was discovered as a young teenager playing “a toilet dive” in his hometown of Beaumont by legendary club owner Clifford Antone, who booked him into his famed Austin venue, then immediately shifted him over to the honky-tonk Broken Spoke, where the likes of Willie Nelson, George Strait and Ernest Tubb have had residencies.
“When I first got to Austin, everybody else sounded like Stevie Ray Vaughan, but I sounded more like Jerry Reed. I didn’t think I was cool, either, because this was before every punk sported that image of Johnny Cash flipping the rod.”
Equally steeped in Texas/Louisiana blues, old-school country and punk-rock, Dayton is the music world’s best-kept secret, hiding in plain sight as a guitarist for Waylon Jennings, Johnny Cash, Ryan Bingham and L.A. punk pioneers X, as well as touring alongside Social Distortion, the Supersuckers and John Doe.
After releasing 11 studio albums and an EP as a solo artist, Dayton’s new album, Mixtape Volume 1, is a series of 10 cover songs he thoroughly makes his own, reinterpreting and revisiting them in a brand-new way. On the first track and single, Jackson Browne’s “Redneck Friend”, Dayton takes the song to a place where it would be equally at home on the first two Eagles albums or as a Rolling Stones collaboration with Gram Parsons. He transforms Neil Young’s “Harvest” into a country plaint complete with pedal steel guitar and hurdy-gurdy piano, while offering a majestic take on Gordon Lightfoot’s “If You Could Read My Mind”.
Brought up on his older sister’s Laurel Canyon folk records, the FM album rock and punk he listened to as a teenager plus the array of country acts who used to tour through Beaumont – including Johnny Cash, Johnny Paycheck, David Allen Coe, Conway Twitty, Hank Jr., and George Jones – Dayton has managed to create a genuine hybrid that takes alt-country and Americana in new, exciting directions.
“The world doesn’t need another outlaw country singer covering Waylon Jennings,” he says of his stylistic mix. “Everyone where I was growing up had no idea Neil Young wrote Waylon’s ‘Are You Ready for the Country?’ or that George Jones’ ‘Bartender’s Blues’ was written by James Taylor, a stoned junkie at the time.”
Turned on to the music’s possibilities by attending an early Clash/Joe Ely tour, Dayton
transforms the U.K. punk icons’ “Bankrobber” into a kind of Bo Diddley shuffle, just as The Clash similarly turned Bobby Fuller Four’s “I Fought the Law” into a three-chord rave-up. He relocates the roots of ZZ Top’s “She’s a Heartbreaker” on the Texas / Louisiana border with some sawing Cajun fiddles, while AC/DC’s “Whole Lotta Rosie” gets the harp-honking Jimmy Reed treatment. The Cars’ new wave ditty, “Just What I Needed”, is reimagined as a George Jones honky-tonk lament, while Bruce Springsteen’s “State Trooper” combines Johnny Cash gravitas, Jim Morrison’s dark bravado and the Boss’ own New York punk duo fave Suicide’s doom-laden theatricality into a compelling whole.
Although he tours nearly 250 days a year, Dayton keeps the home fires burning in the same Austin house he bought thanks to earning 75% of the publishing royalties from writing songs for the soundtracks of three Rob Zombie horror flicks, including The Devils Rejects and Halloween 2 (performing a cameo as Captain Clegg, a roll he revived nightly as the support act on Zombie’s U.S. tour that year).
Dayton’s own career path includes such Zelig-like moments as being recruited by iconic
producer Huey P. Meaux to record with zydeco star Rockin Dopsey at Houston’s famed
Sugarhill Studios; recording his debut album, Raisin’ Cain, with Doug Sahm, Flaco Jiminez and Johnny Gimble, topping the Americana radio charts. He went on to record with Waylon Jennings, Willie Nelson, Johnny Bush and Glen Campbell.
Dayton has more than 50 songs licensed to film and television, writing and directing what he calls a B-movie Roger Corman monster flick, Zombex, in New Orleans, featuring an eclectic cast including Malcolm McDowell, cult actor Sid Haig, Walking Dead’s Lew Temple, Corey Feldman, Slayer’s Tom Araya and X’s John Doe, who promptly asked him to sit in for Billy Zoom, recovering from cancer treatment, on a 40-city tour. His next project is writing his memoirs and short stories for a book to be published next year, and he just finished playing guitar on Guns N’ Roses bassist Duff McKagan’s new solo album.
“You have to be honest with yourself about who you are,” he says, explaining his longevity as a performer. “In terms of surviving, you have to pay attention to the macro as well as the micro.”
Active politically – he’s played several benefits for fellow Texan presidential candidate Beto O’Rourke (once a punk-rock guitarist himself) – Dayton had an intense one-on-one with President Bill Clinton after playing his inaugural ball with Lucinda Williams.
“I’m scared to death about what’s happening now, so I remain vigilant,” he says.
Jesse Dayton has come a long way from the backwaters of his Beaumont hometown,
encouraged by his parents to escape the stranglehold the oil industry-dominated region has on the town’s inhabitants.
“They always pushed me to be an artist,” he says. “You don’t want to be anybody’s slave.”
On Mixtape Volume 1, Jesse Dayton pays tribute to his past, but never keeps his eye off what’s next.



Sleater-Kinney: The Center Won’t Hold
is Sleater-Kinney’s midnight record on the doomsday clock. After twenty-five years of legendary collaboration, rock’n’roll giants Brownstein, Corin Tucker, and Janet Weiss rise to meet the moment by digging deeper and sounding bigger than we’ve heard them yet. Here are intimate battle cries. Here are shattered songs for the shattered survivors. “The Center Won’t Hold drops you into the world of catastrophe that touches on the election,” says guitarist/vocalist Tucker of the title track. “We’re not taking it easy on the audience. That song is meant to be really heavy and dark. And almost like a mission statement, at the end of that song, it’s like we’re finding our way out of that space by becoming a rock band.”



Thee Oh Sees: Face Stabber
Hey there, human kids, lift your face out of the feed trough and pluck that feculence from your ears. Hark! A sonar blip from beneath the pile of bodies-the latest Oh Sees, Face Stabber! Boop, blip, ughhh… people churning like a boiling swamp. Man, this din is nauseating. The screen flickers for the first time this year with a transmission from two months in the future: “the internet has deemed guitar music dead and you are free to do whatever the f*** you like… long live the new flesh!” This album is Soundcloud hip-hop reversed, a far flung nemesis of contemporary country and flaccid algorithmic pop-barf. No songs about money or love are floating in the ether. Just memories, echoes, foggy blurs, blip-blop goes the scope, heavy funk, dystopia-punk canons, long jams, bloated solos dribbling down your caved-in chest. Human cattle like a beef avalanche, right on your burned out face hole. Spider-legs fuzz crawling in your brain. Lots of curse words for your mom. You’ve gotten the over-population blues, so let’s have some art for art’s sake. What else are you gonna do? Stare at the sky? Please… fifty carbon copies of you look back at you as you walk the streets. Take a breath, you’re going to need it. Take drugs, you’re going to need those just to stand in line at the air and water reclamation center soon enough. There’s no fruit, buddy. You’re at the bleak-peak. They will squeeze you till you’re all squeezed out. Or fans of fried prog burn-out, squished old-school drool, double drums, lead weight bass, wizard keys (now with poison), old-ass guitar and horrible words with daft meanings. If you don’t like it then don’t listen, bub. Back to the comments section with you! Easy over and out.



King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard: Infest the Rats’ Nest
the 15th studio album by Australian psychedelic rock band King Gizzard & the Lizard Wizard. The album sees the band exploring more into heavy metal, which the band had only ever briefly touched upon on previous albums. Infest the Rats’ Nest was recorded with only three of the band’s usual seven-man lineup. The album showcases influences completely derived from heavy metal music. The album mixes thrash metal with the bands signature garage rock influenced guitar tones along with their psychedelic and space rock sounds. The album makes consistent use of double kick drumming influenced by heavy metal pioneers Motörhead. The albums themes include ecological disasters and aliens migrating to different planet in which frontman Stu Mackenzie stated was based on events that are happening in real life. Mackenzie also cited the albums strong thrash metal influence derived from bands such as Metallica, Slayer, Exodus, Overkill, Sodom and Kreator.



Rodney Crowell: Texas
Featuring Willie Nelson, Lyle Lovett, Ronnie Dunn, Billy F Gibbons, Randy Rogers, Vince Gill, Lee Ann Womack, Steve Earle, Ringo Starr and more, the 11 tracks on TEXAS represent not just a fresh batch of weathered poetry from one of Americana’s finest craftsmen, but also an iconic singer-songwriter letting loose with his friends.



Eilen Jewell: Gypsy
Described as “one of Americana’s most intriguing and creative voices” (American Songwriter), Jewell has written 11 new songs for Gypsy and is calling it her favorite album yet: new sounds, old sounds, electric guitar-driven rockers, classic country, and tender ballads. Gypsy continues to solidify Jewell’s reputation as one of the most distinctive and potent voices in the Americana world today.



Lillie Mae: Other Girls
From the new track’s opening line, “I ain’t your baby,” the Nashville singer, songwriter, downtown scene slayer, and most-wanted fiddler signals a reclaimed confidence and bold evolution, telling women’s stories – including her own – that build on the strength of her “nervy” (NPR Music), 2017 Jack White-produced debut.

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