News

Upcoming LIVE music at LRS:

Nate Lopez Saturday June 8 2pm-ish
Nate has been playing professionally for many years and at many venues including: 30/90 NOLA, Kimos – Maui, LBC – Santa Rosa CA, Earthfest L.A., NAMM main stage, The Catalyst Club – Santa Cruz, Laguna Beach Jazz and Art Festival, Marriott Hotel in Napa, The Hilton in Union Square S.F., Ghirardelli Square – S.F., Reno Jazz festival, and countless Wineries.He has also been a featured artist on radio stations KRCB, KRSH, KBBF, KVYN and KGGV

“You will note this 8-string guitarist uses every aspect of the guitar to play bass, rhythm and lead, making him a one man band.” – Positively Petaluma
“To Say Nate Lopez just plays guitar is an understatement.” Curtis Kim, KSRO radio
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Saffell Saturday June 29 2pm-ish
Saffell is a sultry, funky, singer songwriter from Northern California. Saffell uses live looping, layering percussion, bass, vocal harmonies and more to create a rich, full sound. What’s unique about Saffell is that he rocks the keys not the guitar.

New Releases

New Releases out now include:


Molly Tuttle: When You’re Ready
the debut album from award-winning guitar virtuoso Molly Tuttle. An insightful, gifted songwriter who was crowned “Instrumentalist of the Year” at the 2018 Americana Music Awards on the strength of her EP Rise, Tuttle has broken boundaries and garnered the respect of her peers, winning fans for her incredible flatpicking guitar technique and confessional songwriting. Graced with a clear, true voice and a keen melodic sense, the 25-year-old seems poised for a long and exciting career. When You’re Ready, produced by Ryan Hewitt (The Avett Brothers, The Lumineers), showcases her astonishing range and versatility and shows that she is more than simply an Americana artist.



Sara Bareilles: Amidst The Chaos
the sixth studio album from singer/songwriter Sara Bareilles. Includes the singles ‘Armor’ and “Fire,” plus “No Such Thing,” “Eyes on You,” “Wicked Love,” “Orpheus” and more. The album was produced by T Bone Burnett. Bareilles has sold over one million albums and over nine million singles and downloads in the United States alone and has earned seven Grammy Award nominations, including one Album of the Year nomination for her album The Blessed Unrest.



The Infamous Stringdusters: Rise Sun
The Infamous Stringdusters rise to new heights on their ninth full-length record Rise Sun. For the album, the GRAMMY® Award-winning quintet-Andy Falco [guitar], Chris Pandolfi [banjo], Andy Hall [dobro], Jeremy Garrett [fiddle], and Travis Book [double bass]-expanded their signature sound by perfecting their seamless fusion of All-American-bluegrass and rock.
Once again sail into uncharted territory moored only by their expressive patchwork of All-American bluegrass threaded together with strands of rock, jazz, funk, country, old-time, and more. As they approached this latest body of work, the group’s ambition matched their outsized creative curiosity. “Rise Sun was sparked by the feeling of wanting something better for the world-more love, more awareness, and more compassion,” says Hall. “It’s a message of taking care of each other, our planet, and ourselves. We all shared this feeling as evidenced by the songs we brought to the project. It’s the feeling of a rising sun as opposed to a dark night. Sometimes a message of hope is less popular than one of despair, but it’s much-needed nevertheless.”



Sunn O))): Life Metal
Sunn O))) co-founders Stephen O’Malley and Greg Anderson began working on new music in early 2018. Following an initial pre-production session at Dave Grohl’s 606 Studios in California, they made their way to Chicago to record at Albini’s Electrical Audio. Oining the band on Life Metal is composer and frequent live collaborator Hildur Guðnadóttir, who adds vocals, electric cello, and haldorophone to the track “Novae”. Additionally, Tim Midyett plays aluminium neck bass and baritone guitars throughout the album, while Anthony Pateras contributes pipe organ to “Troubled Air”.



Norah Jones: Begin Again
New release by the nine-time Grammy-winning singer/songwriter Norah Jones. Begin Again is a collection of singles that gathers seven eclectic songs that Jones has recorded over the past year with collaborators including Jeff Tweedy and Thomas Bartlett. Features the new song “Just a Little Bit,” which was produced by Jones and features her on vocals, piano, and organ along with Brian Blade on drums.



Melissa Etheridge:The Medicine Show
Describing the rocking, anthemic new track and album, Melissa explains, “The sound of the song and the whole record is purposefully aimed at that 90’s rock sound. When rock was moody and fierce. ‘Faded’ is spot on a Melissa Etheridge song. You know it from the first few notes. I wrote it on my twelve string and kept it true to that sound.” For this album, her 15th studio recording, Melissa was reunited with celebrated producer John Shanks (Keith Urban, Bon Jovi, Kelly Clarkson), and was recorded largely live in studio, capturing the raw emotion of the material. – The Medicine Show deals with universal themes of renewal, reconciliation, reckoning, compassion and, most profoundly, healing. Through the songs she processed the deep fears and hurting she saw in the nation on collective and personal levels; “Shaking” about national anxiety, “Here Comes the Pain,” personalizing the opioid crisis, the unifying “Human Chain” about the hope for healing, and the rocking, anthemic “Love Will Live.” More highlights include the album-closer, “Last Hello” drawing on the incredible strengths and courage shown by the survivors of the Parkland school shootings, and the infectious “Wild and Lonely,” exploring themes of her past with a new perspective.



Shovels & Rope: By Blood
Shovels & Rope is one of the hardest-working bands out there today. Throughout their career, Cary Ann Hearst and Michael Trent have constantly been touring, and all the while they’ve made music wherever they can, and recently they’ve taken on two giant new challenges; raising a (growing) family, and helming a successful music festival, Charleston’s High Water Festival. Their album By Blood is a gritty, powerful look into their lives and the world around them, with tender songs commenting on their relationship, and human stories weaving throughout.



Glen Hansard: This Wild Willing
This Wild Willing is Glen Hansard’s fourth solo album. Written and created in Paris, France with a band of brothers; new friends and old, more than 24 musicians collaborating on the album. From his partners in The Frames (Joe Doyle) and Swell Season (Marketa Irglova & Joe Doyle), to his touring family of players, to three Iranian brothers he met in Paris (the Kroshravesh brothers), Glen brought together a group of global talents who each left an indelible mark on this recording. “It became quickly apparent in the studio we were onto something interesting. I was finding new ways into the existing songs and we were improvising new ideas every day. When you surround yourself with great musicians and do your best to keep up, stay loose, give little direction, and allow everyone to bring what they bring, something transformative may happen. This collection of songs is mainly made up of those that came through while improvising and following the melodic lines and threads. Sometimes when you take a small musical fragment and you care for it, follow it, and build it up slowly, it can become a thing of wonder. In this sense, some of these songs weren’t written in the traditional form; they were ideas followed to a conclusion. I want to thank all these great musicians for coming and giving these songs their best. All a song wants is to be heard. I hope something in this music can be of use to you. I know it’s been of great use to me to make it. Beauty is in the ear of the behearer.”



Bruce Hornsby: Absolute Zero
Absolute Zero is Bruce Hornsby’s fourth studio album as a soloist; his discography is eleven total studio albums, including his recordings as Bruce Hornsby and the Range and Bruce Hornsby and the Noisemakers. The album was produced by Bruce Hornsby – Justin Vernon (Bon Iver) and Brad Cook co-produced “Cast Off” and Bruce Hornsby and Tony Berg, co-produced “Meds”. Featured guest artists – yMusic, Jack Dejohnette, Blake Mills, Justin Vernon, The Staves, Sean Carey (Bon Iver), Henry Mancini Institute Orchestra – University of Miami, among others including Bruce’s band The Noisemakers.



John Paul White: The Hurting Kind
Leading up to the sessions for The Hurting Kind, White was inspired by artists like Jim Reeves, Patsy Cline, Roy Orbison, Chet Atkins and Bill Porter. Drawing on these timeless influences, White sought out classic writers like Whisperin’ Bill Anderson and Bobby Braddock to collaborate with. “Coming out of each and every one of these situations, I got a resounding thumbs-up that I was on that right track,” says White of the collaborations. “I didn’t need anybody else’s approval after that.” With The Hurting Kind, White draws on the lush, orchestrated music made in Nashville in the early 1960s, writing about overwhelming love, unraveling relationships and the fading memory of a loved one.



Jade Bird
the debut self-titled debut album from Jade Bird. Featuring breakthrough singles ‘Lottery’, ‘Uh Huh’ and ‘Love Has All Been Done Before’. Twisting big themes of disillusionment, divorce, cheating, sorrow into the realities of an independent-minded, modern British teenager, Jade’s music transcends genre with a wealth of influence coming from everywhere, and anywhere. Classic, contemporary, and a total breath of fresh air in the current musical landscape, Jade Bird is that rare, next-generation artist who appears as clued up on the past as she is determined to learn from it’s lessons: in control, sometimes in your face, and in possession of gifts beyond her years.



Cage the Elephant: Social Cues
the fifth studio album by rock band Cage the Elephant. Social Cues follows Cage the Elephant’s Grammy-winning Tell Me I’m Pretty from 2015, as well as their 2017 live album, Unpeeled. There are 13 tracks in total including a collaboration with Beck titled, “Night Running”. Cage the Elephant formed in 2006 and relocated to London, England, in 2008 before their first album was released. The band’s first album was released in 2008 to much success, spawning several successful radio singles and gained the band a large following in both the United States and the United Kingdom.



The Yawpers: Human Question
The Yawpers are the sheep in wolf’s clothing. Through their first three albums, the group divined a signature style-what Pitchfork described as “an expansive vision of rock ‘n’ roll, one that cherrypicks from various folk traditions: punk, rockabilly, blues, whatever they might have on hand or find in the trash.” The sound is a front-heavy, groovy, fire & brimstone punk-blues overlying a dynamic and metaphysical roots rock. On their fourth album Human Question, the Denver trio zooms out to a more vast and accessible stylistic and spiritual universe. The 38-minute thrill ride generates growth and cathartic self-reflection for audience and performer alike. If there was justice in this world, the Yawpers would be the savior that rock and roll didn’t know it was waiting for.



Rolling Stones: HONK
Triple CD edition. 2019 compilation from the legendary rock ‘n’ roll band featuring the biggest hits and classic cuts from every Rolling Stones Records studio album from 1971 to 2016. This set collects 36 essential Stones’ tracks on the first two discs – including eight Top 10 singles, “Brown Sugar,” “Tumbling Dice,” “Angie,” and much more. The third disc includes 10 live tracks recorded during the band’s more recent sold-out tours and feature guests like Florence Welch, Dave Grohl, Brad Paisley and more.



Bolden
For the original soundtrack of Bolden, in theaters this spring, nine-time GRAMMY Award winner Wynton Marsalis faced a nearly impossible task: bring fellow trumpeter and New Orleanian Buddy Bolden, widely considered one of the fathers of jazz, back from the dead. But on this album, Marsalis enthusiastically resurrects the bawdy, brassy sound of Bolden as no one else can, throwing a Big Easy party that romps through some of Bolden’s most beloved material. Featuring acclaimed vocalists Catherine Russell and Brianna Thomas and an all-star cast of instrumentalists that includes Wycliffe Gordon, Victor Goines, Marcus Printup, and more, Marsalis brings turn-of-the-century New Orleans back to life, imbuing ragtime classics popularized by Bolden and his competitor Louis Armstrong with a modern sound and energy.

Record Store Day is Saturday April 13

Biggest List of Record Store Day Releases yet:
LOOK


The NPR affiliate for Sonoma County is KRCB FM and your old buddy Doug Jayne hosts four Music Shows:
~ Midday Music
~ Our Roots Are Showing
~ Jazz Connections
and….

KRCB-FM New Release Hour
Tuesdays 11:00am / Repeat Wednesdays 7:00pm

Doug Jayne and Brian Griffith

Brian Griffith and Doug Jayne highlight the week’s new musical releases and other fun music-related stuff.
We want to keep you up to date with new music coming through our studios, so every Tuesday morning at 11,
Doug Jayne, from The Last Record Store and KRCB’s Mid-DayMusic and Our Roots Are Showing programs,
sits down with morning host Brian Griffith to go over the most interesting and notable of new releases.
Listen at 11 am on Tuesdays or catch the repeat broadcast on Wednesdays at 7 pm


TUNE IN, TURN ON, AND DROP… THE NEEDLE!
Now on 103.5-FM
Your second chance to listen in on the New Release discussion comes with Needle Droppings, a weekly new-release segment with our very own Doug Jayne and a rotating panel of music junkies, including comedian Steve Ausburne, Rob LoVerde (the mofo from MoFi), Bill DeCarli of Hopmonk Presents, The Godfather of Bacon, JC Flugger, and whoever else we can squeeze into the meat-locker-like studio at KSRO.
Needle Droppings airs Fridays as part of The Drive With Steve Jaxon at 4:20-ish pm on KSRO, at 1350-AM, 103.5-FM, and online at ksro.com. Tune in!
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New Releases ~ March 29, 2019


Billie Eilish: When We All Fall Asleep, WHERE Do We Go?
is the debut album from Billie Eilish and includes ‘When The Party’s Over’, ‘You Should See Me In A Crown’ and ‘Bury A Friend’. The album follows 2017’s Don’t Smile At Me EP which peaked at #14 on the Billboard Top 200 chart.



Steve Earle: Guy
Steve Earle was nineteen and had just hitchhiked from San Antonio to Nashville in 1974. Back then if you wanted to be where the best songwriters were you had to be in there. Guy Clark had moved to Nashville and if you were from Texas, Guy Clark was king. Flash forward more than forty years. In the fall of 2018, Steve and The Dukes went into House Of Blues studio in Nashville and recorded GUY in six days. ‘I wanted it to sound live… When you’ve got a catalog like Guy’s and you’re only doing sixteen tracks, you know each one is going to be strong.’ Earle and his current, perhaps best-ever Dukes lineup, take on these songs with a spirit of reverent glee and invention. But in the end Guy leads the listener back to it’s beginning, namely Guy Clark, which is what any good ‘tribute’ should do. Guy is a saga of friendship, it’s ups and downs, what endures. We are lucky that Earle remembers and honors these things, because like old friends, Guy is a diamond.



Son Volt: Union
On Union, Son Volt’s present and past mingle into strong confluence. The thirteen songs written by founder Jay Farrar confront our turbulent politics and articulate the clarity and comfort music can offer in the tumult. The country and blues sounds explored by Son Volt on it’s last two records (2013’s Honky Tonk and 2017’s Notes of Blue) linger in the grooves of Union. But this record nods to many other mile markers along the band’s 25-year path. Some tunes offer a powerful return to the ringing lyrical clarity of 2005’s Okemah and the Melody of Riot and 2007’s The Search. Others harken back to the freewheeling poetic melodicism of 1994’s Trace and 1997’s Straightaways.



Mekons: Deserted
Emboldened by a sold-out tour and a surge of interest in the States after the release of the documentary Revenge of The Mekons, Mekons retreated to the fringes of Joshua Tree National Park and popular culture to record their new album Deserted.
The long-running, genre-hopping, impossible-to-kill British folk-punk collective summoned the forces of magic, fear and superstition for an album of shifting sand Sturm und Drang. It is at once a distorted howl into the emptiness of space as well as a quiet submission to the shimmering allure of a mirage. The heat and endless horizon can lead to madness or clarity, and while there is relief when the sun goes down you know the deep chill is not far off.



Tim Bluhm: Sorta Surviving
For a moment, you could almost forget what year it was inside the Cash Cabin, the small sanctuary-turned-recording-studio Johnny Cash built roughly 40 years ago in Hendersonville, TN. The Man In Black’s frequent collaborators Dave Roe and Gene Chrisman were back at the bass and drums respectively, and tape was rolling as they counted in the Cash classic “I Still Miss Someone.” Tim Bluhm had to pinch himself.
“Recording in that space with those guys was like a dream come true for me,” says Bluhm. “The depth of knowledge they walk around with in their heads is amazing, and you know you can trust the musical choices they’re making because they have the experience to back it up. When they say, ‘This is what Merle would have done,’ it’s because they know firsthand.” While Bluhm may be best known for the breezy brand of West Coast roots and soul he helped pioneer with his band, The Mother Hips, his brilliant new solo album, Sorta Surviving, revels in his longtime love for classic country music. Recorded and mixed at the Cash Cabin under the guidance of Widespread Panic’s Dave Schools, the collection is earnestly authentic and utterly timeless, and it finds Bluhm backed by elder statesmen like Roe and Chrisman along with younger virtuosos like keyboardist Jason Crosby (Eric Clapton, Dave Matthews) and Jesse Aycock (Hard Working Americans, Elizabeth Cook). “The band brought a certain maturity and experience,” explains Schools. “Tim’s songwriting is so strong that it naturally suggests how to complement itself, but those guys really know how to play and still leave room for a great singer.” Indeed, the arrangements on the album are refined and elegant, yet still stripped-down and raw, enabling Bluhm’s warm, easygoing vocals to sit front-and-center as he weaves vivid tales of ordinary men and women facing down hard days and even harder nights. Mixing new originals and reimagined covers, the record pulls from a half-century of American music to craft a thoroughly modern love letter to a bygone era, one that showcases both Bluhm’s deft musical hand and his heartfelt reverence for the genre. “I’ve been a fan of classic country ever since I heard Merle Haggard sing,” reflects Bluhm. “I just admired his voice and storytelling so much, but I never made an album like this before because I figured it would take me at least 20 or 30 years to get good enough.” Bluhm discovered Haggard around the same time he co-founded the now-iconic Mother Hips, a band the San Francisco Chronicle has hailed as “one of the Bay Area’s most beloved live outfits.” The group began it’s journey at Chico State, where performing at frat parties quickly gave way to club shows, regional touring, and national buzz, and before Bluhm and his bandmates had even graduated, they were already signed to Rick Rubin’s American Recordings on the strength of their debut album, ‘Back To The Grotto.’ “When we signed with American, the label had just put out Johnny Cash’s first Rick Rubin-produced album, which was actually recorded at the Cash Cabin,” says Bluhm. “I got to meet and hang with Johnny a couple times back then, and after that, we opened for him at The Fillmore in San Francisco. I was so impressed with his presence. He definitely lived up to his legend in real life, and he made a big impression on me.” Over the ensuing two-and-a-half decades, the Hips would release nine more studio albums as they cemented their status as festival and critical favorites, sharing bills with everyone from Wilco and Widespread Panic to Lucinda Williams and The Black Crowes along the way. Rolling Stone called them “divinely inspired,” while Pitchfork praised their “rootsy mix of 70s rock and power pop,” and The New Yorker lauded their ability to “sing it sweet and play it dirty.” Ever-curious and wildly prolific, Bluhm simultaneously released a slew of his own solo and collaborative projects on the side. He toured for years as music director with Nicki Bluhm & The Gramblers, teamed up with The Grateful Dead’s Mickey Hart and Bill Kreutzmann among others, and opened up Mission Bells Studio with fellow California favorite Jackie Greene and engineer Dave Simon-Baker. There, Bluhm produced albums for everyone from the Hips and Greene to Hot Buttered Rum and Little Wings in addition to hosting Phil Lesh, Josh Ritter, Rogue Wave, Los Lobos, Jonathan Richman, and more. As if that wasn’t enough to keep him busy, in 2007, Bluhm and the Hips launched the Hipnic, an intimate and immaculately-curated music festival that’s still held annually amongst the towering redwoods of Big Sur. Sorta Surviving marks Bluhm’s first collection recorded outside of California, but one listen and it’s clear that he’s equally at home in the pines of Tennessee. There’s a comfort to the performances, a subtle familiarity that radiates out like a warm invitation. “Most of the songs on this album are second or third takes,” says Schools. “That comes from experience and teamwork, but also from working in a great environment. It’s a palpable thing you feel when you’re working in the room where Johnny Cash wrote his autobiography and recorded some of the best work of his later years. We were definitely all a little nervous meeting for the first time, but we got comfortable real quick there.” The songs are character-driven, valuing the visceral over the cerebral, and Bluhm inhabits his narrators with a voice as tough and as pliable as worn-in leather. “It just felt natural for me to sing this way,” he explains. “It was a chance to put away the books and focus more on the everyday rather than the existential, a chance to pull out the guitar and really tell some stories.” Some of those stories come secondhand: the bluesy “Del Rio Dan” was first popularized by The Everly Brothers in the 1970’s, while the waltzing “Kern River” is a Merle Haggard favorite, and Johnny Cash’s “I Still Miss Someone” gets a melancholy makeover with a tip of the cap to Neil Young’s timeless take on “Oh Lonesome Me.” That the covers fit so seamlessly alongside Bluhm’s original material stands as a testament both to his gifts as a compelling storyteller and his playful way with words. The shuffling “Jesus Save A Singer” tackles struggle and redemption with a wry smile, while the stream-of-consciousness title track sardonically examines our instinct to perpetually press on, and the honky-tonking “Where I Parked My Mind” finds dark wit even in the depths of addiction. “There’s more humor in these songs than anything else I’ve written before,” says Bluhm, “but it’s all very tongue in cheek. That’s a country music tradition.” While tradition guided Bluhm throughout the project, he wasn’t beholden to it, frequently taking risks and pushing boundaries with his performances and arrangements. In the end, his goal wasn’t just to make a country-tinged record, but rather to craft narratives that could truly transport his listeners, that could breathe new life into stories forgotten and stories imagined, tales of dustbowl farmers and oil men and fugitive outlaws and traveling singers. “As a kid growing up in LA, I never even heard of country music,” reflects Bluhm, “but I remember flipping around the radio dial and coming across ‘The Gambler.’ It was a song that just completely transcended genre. It was no more ‘country’ than Mark Twain was ‘country.’ It was a simple, timeless story set to music, and that’s what I’ve ultimately aspired to make myself.”



White Denim: Side Effects
Coming to Mystic Theatre & Music Hall, Petaluma, CA on Tuesday, April 23, 8:30 PM

Side Effects sees White Denim unmasking the darker side of themes from their previous album, Performance. The bands 9th studio album, Side Effects includes the first studio recordings by their current touring roster a formidable lineup that is selling out shows on both sides of the Atlantic. As always, the album is heavy on musicianship, but it also marks a return to the wilder, weirder side of White Denim.

 

New Releases Out Now

NEW RELEASES OUT NOW include:


Karen O & Danger Mouse: Lux Prima
Lux Prima is the debut album from Yeah Yeah Yeahs vocalist Karen O and acclaimed producer Danger Mouse. Includes the single, ‘Woman.’ The straightforward rock stomper puts the Yeah Yeah Yeahs frontwoman’s vocals on display as she screams and croons. “‘Woman’ came like a bolt out of the blue when we were in the studio,” explains O. “We did a first pass where I was blurting unintelligible words and Danger Mouse and I were like ‘Dang! That was intense. What’s that word I keep saying? Woman.’ The atmosphere was volatile with it being just after the election. A lot of people felt helpless like you do when you’re a scared kid looking for assurance that everything is gonna be alright. I like to write songs that anyone can relate to but this one felt especially for the inner child in me that needed the bullies out there to know you don’t f*** with me. I’m a woman now and I’ll protect that inner girl in me from hell and high water.”



Tim O’Brien Band
After many years navigating the outskirts of bluegrass and acoustic music, Tim O’Brien’s dusky, unmistakable vocal timbre and instrumental stylings have this time landed with two feet squarely back in bluegrass. Born in Wheeling, West Virginia, the Grammy winning singer/songwriter and multi instrumentalist grew up singing in church and school, and after seeing Doc Watson on TV, became a lifelong devotee of old time and bluegrass music. ‘Tim O’Brien Band’ is the coming together of a group of musicians perfectly aligned in intention and ability. Purposefully hack, the title is a nod to the nuts and bolts of trad bluegrass, and the singular energy a band such as this can conjure. Well known instrumentalists Mike Bub (bass), Shad Cobb (fiddle) and Patrick Sauber (banjo/guitar) bring the same team effort to the studio that O’Brien fans know from recent live performances, forging Tim’s song choice and delivery into something fluid and breathing.



Todd Snider: Cash Cabin Sessions, Vol. 3
After spending the last six years making rock albums, Todd Snider is going back to folk. Cash Cabin Sessions, Vol. 3 was recorded at Cash Cabin in Hendersonville, TN. Snider wrote the set of songs and played all the instruments on the record, displaying his growth as a musician and vocalist. Of the five songs on which Snider serves up his humorous brand of socio-political commentary, three are performed in the talking blues style. He even had his friends, Jason Isbell and Amanda Shires, contribute backing vocals on a few of the tracks. If Snider is anything, he is a true artist, and he reminds us of that on Cash Cabin Sessions, Vol. 3. At a point in time when the world has never been more complicated and confusing, with people getting louder and louder, Snider did a 180, went back to his roots as a folksinger, to a simpler, quieter form of expression; and it might be what the world is waiting to hear; a man, his guitar, and the truth.



Stephen Malkmus: Groove Denied
Following hot on the heels of 2018’s Sparkle Hard comes Groove Denied, the rejected album Stephen has been telling everyone about. Groove Denied was written in Berlin and Oregon between Malkmus’ soundtrack to the Netflix series Flaked and Sparkle Hard. It finds Stephen in a playful, exploratory mode – recorded by himself in Oregon; Malkmus plays bass, organ, drum machines, a Roland 2080 and a Memorymoog alongside other instruments interspersed with loops and vocal effects. His first album as a solo artist since 2001, Groove Denied is a fine companion to Sparkle Hard, echoing the experimentation (Auto-Tune, genre-dabbling) found there.



The Brian Jonestown Massacre
The Brian Jonestown Massacre burst into 2019 with the release of their 18th full-length album, just seven months after their last one, Something Else (AUK 043CD/LP). The self-titled, nine-track album is released on Anton Newcombe’s A Recordings, and it was recorded and produced at Anton’s Cobra Studio in Berlin. The album was originally going to be released in September of 2018, but due to a hugely successful global tour – taking in USA, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and Europe – the release was delayed. Recorded in early 2018, the album features Sara Neidorf on drums, Heike Marie Radeker (LeVent) on bass, Hakon Adalsteinsson (BJM, Third Sound, Gunman, Holy Ghost) on guitar, and Anton Newcombe on multiple instruments. Also making a guest vocal appearance on “Tombes Oubliées” is Rike Bienert who has sung on previous BJM albums. The band performed songs from the album throughout the European leg of the 2018 tour. Anton Newcombe has been a very busy man over the past few years, having released four critically-acclaimed Brian Jonestown Massacre albums and an EP, one soundtrack album, and two albums with Tess Parks. All releases were fully recorded and produced at Anton’s studio. The Brian Jonestown Massacre track “Bon Bon” was used in the 2015 Palm D’Or winner Dheepan. Anton penned the soundtrack for Moon Dogs, a film directed by multi-BAFTA nominated Philip John (Svengali, Downton Abbey, Being Human).



Snarky Puppy: Immigrance
Immigrance, the new Snarky Puppy studio album, is all about movement. “The idea here is that everything is fluid, that everything is always moving and that we’re all in a constant state of immigration,” explains Michael League.



Jerry Garcia Band: Electric on the Eel
Six CD set. On August 29, 1987 Grateful Dead front man Jerry Garcia led both the Jerry Garcia Band and the Jerry Garcia Acoustic Band for performances at French’s Camp On The Eel River in Piercy, California. Garcia would bring the JGB back to the scenic venue on June 10, 1989 and on August 10, 1991 – now get ready for the spectacular Electric on the Eel set showcasing the Jerry Garcia Band’s electric sets from 8/29/1987, 6/10/1989, and 8/10/1991. The collection features several unreleased rarities including the seldom performed “See What Love Can Do”, “Twilight”, “Lazy Bones”, and “I Hope It Won’t Be This Way Always.” Other rarities from the release include “Everybody Needs Somebody to Love”, “Struggling Man”, “Lay Down Sally” and “You Never Can Tell [C’est La Vie]”.



Tom Russell: October in the Railroad Earth
Singer-songwriter, painter, and essayist Tom Russell describes the songs and sound as: “Jack Kerouac meets Johnny Cash… in Bakersfield.” There are ten new original Tom Russell songs, including the title song from the Irish film Small Engine Repair, featuring Bill Kirchen on lead electric guitar and Eliza Gilkyson singing backup. The GRAMMY-Award winning Texmaniacs appear on Isadore Gonzalez, a track about a Mexican cowboy who died in England during Buffalo Bill’s Wild West Show. A wonderful ride from stories through time and space from an American treasure.



The Cinematic Orchestra: To Believe
The release of their fourth studio album, To Believe, in March 2019, is the next step in a process of constant evolution. Born out of the band’s latest formation, it’s a creative partnership between founder Jason Swinscoe and longtime friend and collaborator Dom Smith, along with an extended family of regular bandmates and collaborators. Guided by a communal spirit, the changing members are consistent with their ethos, where no individual ego takes precedence. Guest vocalists on To Believe include the art-soul singer Moses Sumney, legendary UK rapper Roots Manuva, longtime vocal collaborator Heidi Vogel and many more. To Believe is the product of a long period of gestation, a reflection of the kind of album they wanted to make – the kind of album, that is, they’ve always made: deep, textured, and layered with meaning. With artwork by The Designers Republic™ (Aphex Twin) and mixed by 15 time Grammy Winner Tom Elmhirst, at the legendary Electric Lady studio built by Jimi Hendrix, it’s a masterful return that stands as their most definitive statement as a group. Surveying the musical landscape of 2019, it’s easy to forget how The Cinematic Orchestra have helped to shape it. They’ve long bridged deep-thinking jazz, a soundtrack sensibility and electronic music into new shapes, starting with their 1999 debut, Motion. They’ve forged a path for acts like Floating Points, Kamasi Washington, Ólafur Arnalds and BADBADNOTGOOD, artists who blur different disciplines together to carve out their own new niches. In this sense, the band’s recorded absence is less a break than an embrace of it’s unique relationship with space, with kinship, with dissent, of course with art and sound, but most of all, with one another.



The Faint: Egowork
The Faint’s long-awaited new album, Egowerk, is set to release on March 15, 2019. Made up of vocalist Todd Fink, drummer Clark Baechle, keyboardist Graham Ulicny, and guitarist and bassist Michael “Dapose” Dappen, the group that ignited an electro-pop-punk movement is back with an 11-track deep-dive into themes on modern society, the internet, and ego – specifically social media and it’s dark effects. Opener “Child Asleep” echoes well-loved Faint singles from the Danse Macabre days, with rapidfire techno beats that sear so hot, your forehead will break into a sweat regardless of proximity to a dance floor. And though the synths should sound familiar to any Faint follower, the song’s monotone message is at once classic and current: “If I was wise, I would see I’m a child still asleep.” Elaborating further, Todd says, “It would be amazing if I could wake up from the world that I think I’m awake in already. If there’s a better way of understanding life, I’d love to be privy to it. You see the wisdom of all Gurus in the East, and you know they’re not bothered by this or that. They’ve attained something, and the rest of us are just kind of banging into stuff, trying to figure out what to do with our lives.” It’s been four years since The Faint dropped a proper studio album, and more than two decades since they first tore onto the Midwest scene, alongside area staples Cursive and Bright Eyes, with anxious electro-pop-punk anthems that meshed doomsday themes with thudding dance-floor hooks. The group began to construct Egowerk shortly after releasing their 2016 career-spanning record, CAPSULE:1999-2016, with Baechle making frequent trips back to Omaha from his new home in Philadelphia to mix the record. The band made a unanimous decision to self-produce the entire record, making it unique and far more involved than any of their past work. Despite The Faint’s nihilistic musings on Egowerk, Fink and Baechle remain optimistic that things can improve if society is willing to absorb dueling perspectives. “The more you learn about any issue, any issue at all, the more you understand that it’s more complicated than you think, ” Fink says. “I’d like to see people less convinced that they’re right about everything all the time. I guess I think we’ll figure it out as time goes on.”



Andy Statman: Monroe Bus
Andy Statman further explores the subterranean caverns of American roots music on ‘Monroe Bus’, tapping deeper into the sources that have energized his playing for nearly 50 years. The 2013 NEA National Heritage Fellow and Grammy nominee has become a near-legendary figure in modern bluegrass and string music. From the sublime to the surreal, his ever-changing repertoire is a challenge and a delight to his audience and to fellow musicians. Monroe Bus was originally conceived to be a collection of interpretations and improvisations on the instrumentals of Bill Monroe. Statman says ‘Bill’s music had a tremendous influence on me when I started out as a mandolin player, and has continued to do so ever since… As the project progressed, I found myself writing my own tunes, inspired by some of Monroe’s musical ideas. Some melodies more closely reflect the master’s influence; others go to other places, but still bear that influence. During the mixing, it once again became clear to me how the music one plays and writes is a reflection of the life a person lives”.
For Andy, Bill Monroe’s music was an ongoing conscious synthesis of the music he heard and his life experience. These tunes were written and played in the same spirit, reflecting his experiences and those of his fellow musicians on these sessions. He brought back Grammy nominated fiddler Michael Cleveland, who contributed mightily to his last CD, Superstring Theory, along with veteran trio members Jim Whitney (bass) and Larry Eagle (drums). Completing the core group, and also significantly expanding the aural palette of the ensemble, is Glenn Patscha (keyboards), who was a member of the New York Americana group Ollabelle and who most recently toured the country in Ry Cooder’s band. Michael Daves (acoustic guitar) rounds out the group on three of the tracks.

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